SMILE GAME BUILDER Tutorials Extra #X03: Marie's Flowers
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SMILE GAME BUILDER Tutorials Extra #X03: Marie’s Flowers

The SMILE GAME BUILDERTutorials Extra X03: Marie’s Flowers focuses on fetching Marie’s roses so she will join you. There’s a neat feature – MMORPG style – where the flowers have a "particle effect" that’ll disappear when you collect a rose.

Video Tutorial

Tutorials Extra Part #X04

The next part of the Tutorials Extra series will focus on Ignaz, who (in the original tutorial) requested money before he would join. He wanted a fixed amount, but this time he’ll request a random amount.

SMILE GAME BUILDER Tutorials Extra #X02: Recruiting Marie
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SMILE GAME BUILDER Tutorials Extra #X02:
Recruiting Marie

The SMILE GAME BUILDERTutorials Extra #X02: Recruiting Marie video is up on YouTube.

Marie requires flowers before she will join the party. This tutorial sets her conditions up and, when you have her flowers, her name gets crossed off the recruitment note (from Part 1) after she joined.

Video Tutorial

Tutorials Extra Part #X03

The next part of the Tutorials Extra series focuses on the flowers "fetch quest" for Marie, with an additional particle effect indicating where the flowers are (in the same style as many MMORPGs).

SMILE GAME BUILDER Tutorial #68: Message Control Characters (Part 1)
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SMILE GAME BUILDER Tutorial #68:
Message Control Characters (Part 1)

The SMILE GAME BUILDER Tutorial #68:Message Control Characters (Part 1) is uploaded to YouTube. It goes through using the control characters from page 110 of the manual to insert variable and string values in messages.

Message Control Characters (Part 1) Video Tutorial

Message Control Characters (Part 2)

The next part will cover more control characters, this time messages and text decoration from page 116 of the manual.

Posted in Tutorials

Smile Game Builder — Character Select Menu (Part 1) |
Mottzy Minutes #9

The latest tutorial in Mottzy Minutes demonstrates how to create and implement a character select menu system in SMILE GAME BUILDER.

Character Select Menu Video

Parts 1 & 2

Part 1 covers the rendering the menu and the select box to select characters.

In Part 2, he’ll deal with the character selection and camera rendering process!

Mottzy’s Links

It will become part of the MakerBaseSGB project.

You can also check out Mottzy’s blog for more news on his projects and his for more tutorials.

Posted in Tutorials

Smile Game Builder — Variable Sorting |
Mottzy Minutes #7

This is another tutorial video in the Mottzy Minutes YouTube series.

Mottzy looks extensively at creating and using a variable sorting algorithm in SMILE GAME BUILDER.

Sorting Variables Video Tutorial

This is longer than his usual videos, but it’s worth watching all the wa through. You can also check out Mottzy’s blog for updates on all of his projects and his for more tutorials.

Posted in Tutorials

SMILE GAME BUILDER Tutorial 66: Advanced Variables (Part 2)

The SMILE GAME BUILDER tutorial, #66: Advanced Variables (Part 2), is up on YouTube.

We’re starting with basics and then working up to more advanced game development techniques using variables.

Tutorial Video

Smile Game Builder Tutorial 58: Tips & Tricks (Part 9)
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Smile Game Builder Tutorial #58: Tips & Tricks (Part 9)

The SMILE GAME BUILDER Tutorial 58: Tips & Tricks (Part 9) video is up. It includes animated terrains and console-like commands for effects, such as flash screen and shake screen.

Tutorial Video

Future Tutorials

The concept of console commands has inspired me and given ideas to expand the "console" for other things, which I’ll put in a future tutorial.

Smile Game Builder Tutorial 56: Local Variables (Part 1)
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Smile Game Builder Tutorial #56:
Local Variables (Part 1)

This week’s Smile Game Builder tutorial #56: Local Variables (Part 1) is online. It showcases Local Variables and some of the things you can do with them.

Tutorial Video

Part 2

Part 2 will be uploaded next week, with more techniques for using Local Variables.

Live-Streaming Smile Game Builder

I’ll be live-streaming Smile Game Builder more regularly soon, including collabs, simultaneously multi-streaming to Twitch and YouTube.

In fact, I already tested this on Friday July 6, 2018, on Twitch and YouTube.

This was a test to see how efficiently it worked and it seemed to go well, so I’ll use this format from now on!

Smile Game Builder Tutorial 55: Beam Me Up, Scotty!
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Smile Game Builder Tutorial #55: Beam Me Up, Scotty!

This week’s Smile Game Builder Tutorial #55: Beam Me Up, Scotty! is uploaded. Enter passcodes to teleport to different maps via a teleporter or warp gate event. It’s a bit like the Teleport Mirrors in Might & Magic World of Xeen. Perfect for adding variety to your game!

Video Tutorial

Extended Version

There is no extended version of this tutorial, but check my social media – Twitter, Pinterest and Facebook – or this blog for updates.

Smile Game Builder An Anatomy of Switches - Part 1: Basics
Posted in Tutorials

An Anatomy of Switches
Part 1: Basics

What Is A Switch?

A Switch is a function that allows you to trigger certain events when the switch is activated. Those familiar with RPG Maker in particular will already know about switches and the same applies in Smile Game Builder.

In Smile Game Builder, there are five types of switches:

  • Local Switch
  • Global Switch
  • Variable Switch
  • Conditional Switch
  • Trigger Switch

In this article, I’ll go through each one in turn, with examples as necessary. This is a basic outline of each type’s function within SGB, but in future parts I’ll expand them with more details.

Local Switch

A Local Switch is unique to each event. That means that they can only be used in that event and values can’t be transferred to other events.

Some of the more common uses of local switches are for chests and other searchables. They’re also used in certain “stationary” events, such as moving NPCs left or right if you give them specified items.

You’d use local switches when you know you’re only going to use them in single events and nowhere else.

There’s only one Local Switch and, honestly, that’s all you need.

Global Switch

Whenever you want to use switches across events, you’d use a Global Switch.

One example might be if you wanted to trigger something from one map and activate it on another map. A global switch is particularly useful for this, since it can be used anywhere in your game and, therefore, can be turned ON or OFF at any time as well.

SGB has a total of 999 switches, which may seem a lot, but it still mounts up if you use them excessively. It’s better to use a combination of the switches in this list, depending on what you intend to do.

Variable Switch

A Variable Switch is for using variables to trigger other events based on their values.

I’ve used variable switches for sequencing event triggers in intros or cut scenes, notably in Tutorial #21.

Another example is for checking Player Direction or Camera Mode. Their values are stored in a variable, which can then act as a switch depending on the direction the player is facing or whether the camera is in normal view or first-person view.

Things like Held Money or Inventory (in the Event Sheet Conditions) can also be classed as variable switches, since their values are stored.

Conditional Switch

Conditional Switches are specifically for when you use conditions in Event Sheet Conditions, such as toggling switches (Event Switch/Switch) or checking if an ally is in the party (Ally/Party).

If any of the specific conditions are true, then the event triggers as a switch so that the events in the Event Details will activate.

Conditional switches can also be used in Event Panels. In Event Switches/Condition Checks, Check Variable Box and Check Switch Box are conditional switches because they do something based on certain conditions. (A lot more will be added in the future.)

With Conditional Switches, if you have more than one in the Event Sheet Conditions, then all of them need to be met in order to run the event.

Trigger Switch

The final type of switch is the Trigger Switch. This is set in the Event Details and activates depending on which one you use.

The most common is When Main Hero Talks, where if the action key is pressed, then whatever you put in the Event Details will run to execute the event. It’s usually used for opening doors and chests, or talking with people – interacting with other events requiring some kind of action.

The two other Trigger Switches of note are Triggered Automatically (1 Time Only) and Automatically Start (Synchronize and Run Repeatedly), which work in similar ways, but with some major differences.

The former activates once when conditions to trigger the event are met and the latter runs repeatedly in the background when the conditions are met and will continue until those conditions become false.

In Tutorial #15, there’s a more detailed explanation of event triggers as a whole, which you can watch to see how each one works.

Notes About Switches

  • Switches can be used in the same way in Common Events as events placed on maps.
  • Event triggers (in Event Details) affect how events are run. With the exception of Triggered Automatically (Repeated) and Automatically Start (Synchronize and Run Repeatedly), the events will run through once until the end is reached or their conditions change.
  • Switches in general can be used in one of two ways:
    1. Placed as Event Sheet Conditions, where the events will run depending on the trigger and the condition(s) being met, or
    2. If used in the Event Details, conditions on other sheets (up to a maximum of 20 per event) will run. This will continue until all conditions are met or there are no other conditions.
  • Automatically Start (Synchronize and Run Repeatedly) takes priority over all of the other triggers, which also affects when and how switches are activated.

In Conclusion

This concludes the first part of the multi-part series An Anatomy of Switches. In the next parts, I’ll go through each one in more detail and how they can be used effectively for all kinds of things. I’ll also reference their use in my tutorials as that arises.

Note that these are not the “official” categorization of switches. They’re my own, which I’ve deemed easier to reference and which I’ll be using in future parts.